In the United States, the laws that cover dog bites can vary greatly from state to state, with many differences regarding liability, filing deadlines, and potential damages. It is therefore important to know how dog bite laws in your own state work. With this in mind, here is a brief overview of dog bite laws in the state of Maine.

While many states enforce a “one-bite rule” that makes an owner exempt from liability the first time their dogs bite somebody, Maine does not. Instead, Maine is a “strict liability state,” holding dog owners responsible for damages the first time their dog bites another person. This means that if you have been bitten by a dog, or have had a dog damage your property, you may have grounds for a lawsuit even if the dog has never done anything similar before.

The grounds for liability in a Maine dog bite case are primarily based on three conditions. You may be able to hold a dog owner liable for injury or destruction of property if the following are all true:

  • The defendant’s dog injured you, damaged your property, or both.
  • You were not at fault for the injury (e.g. you did not provoke the attack, you were not trespassing on the owner’s property).
  • If you were bit on the owner’s property, you have to show that the owner was negligent in controlling the dog.

If you were the victim of a dog attack in the last six years, the attorneys at Lowry & Associates will give you a free legal consultation. To learn more about Maine’s dog bite laws and how they may apply to your case, contact us by calling 1-800 999-5342. Lowry & Associates serves clients in Bangor, Portland, and throughout Maine.