mother and children laying in a hammockHalloween night can be particularly dangerous for two main reasons: adults may be more likely to drive drunk after a night of Halloween revelry, and more children are out walking around near roadways in the evening hours, which increases the risk of pedestrian accidents. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says Halloween is the third most deadly holiday for pedestrians in the US.

To encourage greater safety for everyone on Halloween night, NHTSA offers the following tips:

For Parents and their Trick-or-Treaters:

  • If your children are under the age of 12, they should be accompanied by an adult when they go trick-or-treating at night.
  • Make sure your children trick-or-treat in groups, in well-lit and familiar neighborhoods.
  • Avoid any hats or masks that obscure a child’s field of vision.
  • Have children carry a flashlight or glow sticks.
  • Make sure you and your trick-or-treaters always cross at crosswalks, traffic signals and corners.
  • Teach your children to look both ways before crossing the street.

For Motorists:

  • crosswalk signIn residential areas, be alert and reduce your speed.
  • Exercise extra care when backing out of driveways and alleys. Children often run across these intersections between sidewalks and driveways without looking.
  • Do not use electronic devices and avoid other sources of distraction.
  • Designate a sober driver or have a public transportation and/or walking plan for if you are too inebriated to drive.
  • Call the police if you see a driver who appears to be driving drunk.

Taking the time to remind yourself to exercise extra caution, care and alertness can go a long way in preventing auto and pedestrian accidents on Halloween night.

If you or a loved one has been injured in a Portland or Bangor auto accident, orĀ in an accident anywhere in the state of Maine, please contact Lowry & Associates for a free case evaluation.